SBP's message for the grassroots is intended to brief the people in a short and clear away - through a conversation - about SBP's ideology and commitment. First, Rabi Kant Bharti's talk that is based on this message. Then the message itself. SBP strongly recommends that all its members and candidates use a version of this message to communicate with the people.

OUTLINE OF THE SCRIPT

The ideas of liberty, when explained in a simple language with examples from their own experience, resonate well with our main audience – the poor, subsistence farmers/ daily wage labourers.

We start our conversation by asking what problems they are facing. They generally respond with issues like corruption, education, health, water, police, justice, crime, pollution, electricity. But the biggest one is the dearth of gainful employment.

We then ask - what is at the root of all these problems/issues. They respond with lack of money, education etc. But when prodded further (with hints) they acknowledge that the root cause of these problems arises through politics. Even if we don’t want anything to do with politics, but politics has a lot to do with our lives. It is like the fish that can’t ignore water. It is all around it.

We then ask:  what is a government? A lot of people say that they are the powerful – the ‘mai-baap’ or ‘mailk’. To get people to understand the question better we ask: But how does a government work? People usually say that we choose the government. But we ask: Where does the government get its money from? After some prodding we establish that governments operate from taxes collected from us – the people. Everything is taxed, our incomes, services, natural resources. Even the beggar pays sales taxes. We confirm that governments are basically paupers. They own nothing, produce nothing. But governments have the power to tax – and therefore spend hundreds of crores on infrastructure  and on government officials.

We therefore establish the first principle: the government is our servant not our master. सरकार हमारी नौकर है. The DM is our servant, the police officer is our servant.

But then we point out that in India governments act as our master. We ask: Why are we scared of corrupt government officials in authority?

We then start asking: what’s the job of this servant? To get to the bottom of this, we ask: what is the most important for us human-beings? To this people respond with things like jobs, education, food, water, air, money. But we prod them further – what is the thing that’s most valuable - our life. So, a government’s main job is to protect our lives, i.e. to provide security – from criminals and from outside forces.

Then we move to the next function. We observe that it is inevitable that in a society there will be conflicts of interests. As examples are discussed of grassroots experience, people realise justice is a very significant function. This is the government’s second most important job. People generally agree that if there was fair justice and timely delivery, it will bring about sea change in the lives of the people. Crime will go down drastically, corruption will be reduced.

People then realise that without security and justice, no government policy or plan will be able to function properly.

We give an example – that to till land we need two oxen and a plough. If we put the plough before the oxen we cannot till the land. The two oxen are like security and justice with the plough representing various policies and our productivity.

Another example we give: Take any house. What is its most important part? Some say: the bricks, cement, roof, windows. But after discussions we all agree that the foundation on which the house or the building stands, is most important. Unless the foundations is strong we can’t build a good house or add new floors to it. Similarly, security and justice are the foundational roles of government. Without them nothing else can works.

This brings us to the crossroads: If it is so easy to understand that security and justice are core functions of government, why do other political parties never talk about fixing these first? They talk about skill development, digital India, free laptops, MNREGA, roads, space programs – which involve taking our money and distributing it to us after taking a cut, but never talk about security and justice.

People then catch on. They realise that if security and justice was fixed, the criminal empires of these parties can’t run.

We tell them that no existing party will fix these basic things. They benefit most from a failure of security and justice.

People say that no one has every told them these things, but it makes all the sense.

Then comes the call to action. Everyone asks: What should be done?

At this we tell them a story: Once there was a big fire in the jungle and all the animals were running here and there. Some were standing on the side, watching the jungle burn down. Then an eagle flying above sees a little sparrow trying to do something. The eagle comes down and asks – what are you doing, sparrow? The sparrow says: I am bringing water in my beak to douse the jungle fire. The eagle laughs. But the little sparrow says: Maybe I won’t but when the history is written, my name will not be in the list of bystanders and those fleeing. It will be in the list of those who tried to put out the fire.

This story makes a huge emotional impact . Everyone agrees that to remain a mute spectator under the circumstances is cowardice.

Then we tell them that we are fortunate to be human beings. We can organise and change things. We then talk about  Swarna Bharat Party.

Note: In every meeting I have been to in December 2017,  people have always wanted to join us. We ask for a token sum of Rs. 2. They tell us that they will give Rs. 10, 50, 100. They want to work with us.

that the ideas of liberty, when explained in a simple language with examples from their own experience, resonate well with our main audience – the poor, subsistence farmers/ daily wage labourers.

We start our conversation by asking what problems they are facing. They generally respond with issues like corruption, education, health, water, police, justice, crime, pollution, electricity. But the biggest one is the dearth of gainful employment.

We then ask - what is at the root of all these problems/issues. They respond with lack of money, education etc. But when prodded further (with hints) they acknowledge that the root cause of these problems arises through politics. Even if we don’t want anything to do with politics, but politics has a lot to do with our lives. It is like the fish that can’t ignore water. It is all around it.

We then ask:  what is a government? A lot of people say that they are the powerful – the ‘mai-baap’ or ‘mailk’. To get people to understand the question better we ask: But how does a government work? People usually say that we choose the government. But we ask: Where does the government get its money from? After some prodding we establish that governments operate from taxes collected from us – the people. Everything is taxed, our incomes, services, natural resources. Even the beggar pays sales taxes. We confirm that governments are basically paupers. They own nothing, produce nothing. But governments have the power to tax – and therefore spend hundreds of crores on infrastructure  and on government officials.

We therefore establish the first principle: the government is our servant not our master. सरकार हमारी नौकर है. The DM is our servant, the police officer is our servant.

But then we point out that in India governments act as our master. We ask: Why are we scared of corrupt government officials in authority?

We then start asking: what’s the job of this servant? To get to the bottom of this, we ask: what is the most important for us human-beings? To this people respond with things like jobs, education, food, water, air, money. But we prod them further – what is the thing that’s most valuable - our life. So, a government’s main job is to protect our lives, i.e. to provide security – from criminals and from outside forces.

Then we move to the next function. We observe that it is inevitable that in a society there will be conflicts of interests. As examples are discussed of grassroots experience, people realise justice is a very significant function. This is the government’s second most important job. People generally agree that if there was fair justice and timely delivery, it will bring about sea change in the lives of the people. Crime will go down drastically, corruption will be reduced.

People then realise that without security and justice, no government policy or plan will be able to function properly.

We give an example – that to till land we need two oxen and a plough. If we put the plough before the oxen we cannot till the land. The two oxen are like security and justice with the plough representing various policies and our productivity.

Another example we give: Take any house. What is its most important part? Some say: the bricks, cement, roof, windows. But after discussions we all agree that the foundation on which the house or the building stands, is most important. Unless the foundations is strong we can’t build a good house or add new floors to it. Similarly, security and justice are the foundational roles of government. Without them nothing else can works.

This brings us to the crossroads: If it is so easy to understand that security and justice are core functions of government, why do other political parties never talk about fixing these first? They talk about skill development, digital India, free laptops, MNREGA, roads, space programs – which involve taking our money and distributing it to us after taking a cut, but never talk about security and justice.

People then catch on. They realise that if security and justice was fixed, the criminal empires of these parties can’t run.

We tell them that no existing party will fix these basic things. They benefit most from a failure of security and justice.

People say that no one has every told them these things, but it makes all the sense.

Then comes the call to action. Everyone asks: What should be done?

At this we tell them a story: Once there was a big fire in the jungle and all the animals were running here and there. Some were standing on the side, watching the jungle burn down. Then an eagle flying above sees a little sparrow trying to do something. The eagle comes down and asks – what are you doing, sparrow? The sparrow says: I am bringing water in my beak to douse the jungle fire. The eagle laughs. But the little sparrow says: Maybe I won’t but when the history is written, my name will not be in the list of bystanders and those fleeing. It will be in the list of those who tried to put out the fire.

This story makes a huge emotional impact . Everyone agrees that to remain a mute spectator under the circumstances is cowardice.

Then we tell them that we are fortunate to be human beings. We can organise and change things. We then talk about  Swarna Bharat Party.

Note: In every meeting I have been to in December 2017,  people have always wanted to join us. We ask for a token sum of Rs. 2. They tell us that they will give Rs. 10, 50, 100. They want to work with us.